Recent studies indicate that many people experience depressive syndrome. Hence this research paper will compare and contrast two psychotherapies for depressions. From these studies, one can then conclude which overall psychotherapy program for depressions is the most efficient. These psychotherapies are the IPC (Interpersonal Counseling) was developed by Weissman and Klerman et al. (2003) and the Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depression (IPT) (Frank et. al, 2006).

Like IPT, IPC assumes symptoms of depression occur in a psychosocial and interpersonal context (Weissman and Klerman et al. , 2003). Because of the similarity between the IPC and IPT groups, they were combined for comparisons with the other interventions such as the Transtheoretical Psychotherapy, Integrative Treatment Model and the Psychotherapy Integration Movement groups. There were no significant differences between these groups in terms of any sociodemographic variables measured except education; it was higher in the IPC and IPT groups.

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Comparisons on health and psychosocial characteristics show a different picture. On every health and psychosocial measure, those in the subdysthymic group scored much closer to the negative pole than those in the Transtheoretical Psychotherapy, Integrative Treatment Model and the Psychotherapy Integration Movement groups. Consistent with the indicators of depressed mood, the Transtheoretical Psychotherapy, Integrative Treatment Model and the Psychotherapy Integration Movement groups was more similar to those with a syndromal depression than to the IPT and IPC groups.

Results from empirical studies suggest patients benefit from psychotherapy. INTRODUCTION Depression became recognized as an important public health concern in the late 1990s, research into more effective interventions were sought. Increasingly nowadays, it became clear that depression was a major health concern in the population, thus an interest was developed in studying the best interventions for this group. It was in this context that this research paper of comparing two psychotherapies for depressions are conducted.

Specifically, will compare and contrast the psychotherapies for depressions. From these studies, one can then conclude which overall psychotherapy program for depressions is the most efficient. Depression as a generic term includes several psychiatric syndromes including major depression, dysthymia and depressive symptoms and syndromes. According to the Diagnosis and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (1994), the term depression refers to a symptom or group of symptoms which is better described as depressive symptoms resulting in a depressive episode.

A Major Depressive Episode is defined as occurring over a period of at least two weeks during which there is either a depressed mood (such as feeling sad, hopeless, or discouraged) or the loss of interest or pleasure in almost all activities. Additionally, the individual must experience at least four other symptoms which may include changes in appetite or weight, sleep, and psychomotor activity; decreased energy; feelings of worthlessness or guilt; difficulty thinking, concentrating, or making decisions; or recurrent thoughts of death or suicidal ideation, plans, or attempts.

The symptoms must exist for most of the day, nearly every day for at least two consecutive weeks. The episode must cause the individual distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning or at a minimum require markedly increased effort. A Major Depressive Episode does not result from physiological changes from recreational drugs, medications, alcohol, exposure to toxins, from a medical condition, or from bereavement. A review of the literature revealed limited research with the interventions for depressions until the late 1990`s (Paykel et al. , 2008).

Research tended to focus on prevalence rates and studies of institutional impatients, measuring medication compliance or behavioral problems. By 2000 research grew, with prevalence studies and several intervention outcome studies of primarily female outpatients and caregivers. Institutionalized inpatient studies continued to emphasize medication compliance while more recent studies of medical inpatient rehabilitation units measured performance in achieving therapy goals (Sherbourne, 2004).