The problem with pop publications is their acceptance of definitions of success. The assumption is that women value, or should value, the same things as men. Gail Evans’ best selling Play Like a Man puts the point directly. “To a guy, everything counts. The size of his office, the size of his staff, the size of his salary, the size of anything that can be measured. And they’re always keeping score. ” If women don’t do the same, they will be “perceived as losers. ” Anyone willing to settle for a “cramped office and dumpy furniture” doesn’t “know the score” and won’t be taken seriously.

LOIS Franken, In Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office, makes a salary claim: “Money Is power. ” And girls who don’t fight for salaries are not only underpaid but undervalued. Almost never do these publications acknowledge the possibility that women could, or should, have a different set of priorities than pay and perks: more humane hours, better work,’family and child care policies, greater support for community service, and so forth. Rather, the emphasis Is on enabling women to score higher under rules not of their own making.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

Women’s capacity to change the rules through collective action test at best glancing attention in these publications. Their relentless focus on individual advancement diverts attention from institutional reform. The leadership elite objective is getting more women into positions of power. What they do when they get there is a matter of little apparent concern. Yet as the following discussion suggests, it is women’s leadership on women’s issues that is often critical in opening the opportunities that pop publications exalt.

Women on the leadership track have unique opportunities and corresponding obligations to promote changes that will eke leadership accessible to others. As citizens, women can support policies, politicians, and practices that will advance gender equity. As professionals and community activists, women can make equalizing leadership opportunities a priority. And as parents, women can model effective leadership and challenge the childrearing patterns that work against it. An example involves daughters and dolls.

At early ages, children form gender-linked preferences in toys. As leadership experts note, the culture in general and parents in particular often reinforce these references. Giving sophisticated military games to boys and Burbles to girls helps perpetuate traditional gender roles and gender Inequalities. Over a billion Burbles have been sold in 150 countries, and the most popular accessories Include Jewelry, recipe boxes, and vacuum cleaners. A parody by Nylon magazine of a fictional CEO Barbie speaks volumes about the messages being sent.

The magazine describes a mock protest against Mantel for bringing out a doll that fosters “ridiculously unattainable Images. ” The company’s mock response Is a statement by Its four top ale leaders claiming that the CEO doll represents a positive Image and demonstrates that “young girls can be anything they want. There Is nothing standing In their way. ” The challenge for parents Is to reinforce their daughters’ aspirations while also preparing them, at appropriate ages, for the obstacles that, in fact, still stand in the way.

Gender Stereotypes By caveats size of his office, the size of his staff, the size of his salary, the size of anything that can be measured. And they’re always keeping score. ” If women don’t do the same, dumpy furniture” doesn’t “know the score” and won’t be taken seriously. Lois Franken, in Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office, makes a similar claim: “Money is power. ” And girls who don’t fight for salaries are not only underpaid but undervalued.

Almost never do these publications acknowledge the possibility that women could, or should, work/family and child care policies, greater support for community service, and so forth. Rather, the emphasis is on enabling women to score higher under rules not of preferences. Giving sophisticated military games to boys and Barbie’s to girls helps perpetuate traditional gender roles and gender inequalities. Over a billion Barbie’s have been sold in 150 countries, and the most popular accessories include Jewelry, recipe boxes, and vacuum cleaners.