navys mission
the mission of the navy is to protect and defend the right of the United states and our allies to move freely on the oceans and to protect our country against her enemies.

sailor’s creed
I am a united states sailor.I will support and defend the constitution of the United States of America and I will obey the orders of those appointed over me.I represent the fighting spirit of the navy and those that have gone before me to defend freedom and democracy around the world.I proudly serve my country’s navy combat team with honor, courage and commitment.

I am committed to excellence and the fair treatment of all.

Anchors aweigh
Stand Navy out to sea Fight our battle cry We’ll never change our course So vicious foe steer shy-y-y-y Roll out the T.N.T. Anchors Aweigh Sail on to victory and Sink their bones to Davy Jones hooray!Anchors Aweigh my boys Anchors Aweigh farewell to foriegn shores, We sail at break of day day day day Through our last night on shore Drink to the foam Until we meet once more Here’s wishing you a happy voyage home! blue of the mighty deep; gold of God’s great sun, let these our colors be till all of time be done, be done.

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on seven seas we learn navy’s sten call:faith, courage, service true, with honor over, honor over, all.

navy core values
honor, courage, commitment
birth day of the navy
oct 13 1775
esprit de corps
spirit of the group
adrift
loose from moorings and out of control(applied to anything lost, out of hand or left lying about)
aft-end
near or toward the stern of the vessel
abaft
farther aft, as in “abaft the beam.”
abeam
abreast; on a relative bearing of 090 or 270 degrees.
aboard
on or in a ship or naval station
accomadation ladder
a ladder resembling stairs that is suspended over the side of a ship to facilitate boarding from a boats
AFFF
aqueous film forming foam.

aft
toward the stern
after
that which is farthest aft
afternoon watch
the 1200 to 1600 watch
aground
that part of a ship resting on the bottom
ahoy
a hail or call for attention, as in “boat ahoy”
alee
downwind
all hands
the entire ships company
aloft
generally speaking any area above the highest deck.
alongside
by the side of the ship or pier
amidships
an indefinite area midway between the bow and the stern;”rudder amidships” means that the rudder is in line with the ship’s centerline.
anchorage
an area designated to be used by ships for anchoring
anchor cable
the line, wire, or chain that attaches a vessel to her anchor
armament
the weapons of a ship
ashore
on the beach or shore.
astern
behind a ship
athwart
across; at right angles to
auxiliary
extra, or secondary, as in auxiliary engine; a vessel whose mission is to supply or support combatant forces.

avast
stop, as in “avast heaving”
aweigh
an anchoring term used to describe the anchor clear of the bottom(the weight of the anchor is on the cable)
aye, aye
reply to a command or order, meaning “I understand and will obey”
barge
a blunt-ended craft, usually nonself-propelled, used to haul supplies or garbage; a type of motorboat assigned for the personal use of a flag officer
batten down
the closing of any watertight fixtures
battle lantern
a battery-powered lantern for emergency use.
beam
the extreme width(breadth) of a vessel as in a cv has a greater beam than a destroyer.
bear
to be located on a particular bearing, as in the lighthouse bears 045 degrees.

bear a hand
provide assistance, as in “bear a hand with riggingthe brow” expedite.
bearing
the direction of an object measured in degrees clockwise form a reference point(true bearings use true north as the reference, relative bearings use the ships bow as the reference and magnetic bearings use magnetic north as the reference
belay
to secure a line to a fixed point; to disregard a previous order or stop an action, as in “belay the last order or “belay the small talk.
below
beneath , or beyond somthing as in lay below.
berth
bunk: duty assignment; mooring space assigned to a ship.
bight
a loop in a line
bilge
lowest area of a ship where spills and leaks gather; to fail an examination.
billet
place or duty to which one is assigned.

binnacle
a stand containing a magnetic compass.
binnacle list
list of persons excused from duty due to illness.
bitt
cylindrical upright fixture(usually found in pairs) to which mooring or towing lines are secured aboard ship
bitter end
the free end of a line
block
roughly equivelent to a pulley
BMOW
boatswain’s mate of the watch
boat boom
a spar rigged out from the side of an anchored or moored ship to which boats are tied when not in use.
boatswains chair
a seat attached to a line fo hoisting a person aloft or lowering over the side
boatswains locker
a compartment usually forward where line and other equipment use by the deck force are stowed.
bollard
a strong cylindrical, upright fixture on a pier to which ships mooring lines are secured.
boom
a spar usually movable used for hoisting loads
boot topping
black paint applied to a ships sides along the water-line.

bow
the forward end of a ship or boat
bow hook
member of a boats crew whose station is forward
break out
to bring out supplies or equipment from a stowage space.
breast line
mooring line that leads from ship to pier or anothe ship if moored alongside) at right angles to the ship and is used to keep the vessel from moving laterally away from the pier or other ship.
bridge
area in the superstructure from which a ship is operated
brig
jail
brightwork
bare (unpainted)metal that is kept polished
broach to
to get crosswise to the direction of the waves(puts the vessel in danger of being flipped over by the waves)
broad
wide as in broad in the beam
broad
on the bow or quarter- halfway between dead ahead and abeam, and halfway between abeam and astern, respectively.
broadside
simultaneously and to one side when firing main battery guns; sidewise, as in the curren carried the broadside to the beach
brow
gangplank, used for crossing from one ship to another and from a ship to a pier.
bulkhead
a vertical partition in a ship(never called a wall)
buoy
an achored float used as an aid to navigation or to mark the location of an object
BUPERS
bureau of naval personnel
C M/C
command master chief
cabin
living compartment of a ships commanding officer
camel
floating buffer between a ship and a pier to prevent damage by rubbing or banging(in the water)
can buoy
a cylindrical navigational buoy painted green and odd numbered which in us water marks the port side of a channel from seaward
carry away
to break loose as in the rough seas carried away the liflines
chafing gear
material used to protect lines from excessive wear
chain locker
space where anchor chain is stowed
chart
nautical counterpart of a road map showing land configuration and water depths and aids to navigation
chart house
the navigators work compartment
chip
to remove paint or rust from metallic surfaces with sharp pointed hammers befor apllying paint
chock
deck fittin through which mooring lines are led
chow
food
co
commaning officer
colors
national ensign; the ceremony of raising and lowering the ensign
combatant ship
a ship whose primary mission is combat
commission pennant
a long narrow starred and striped pennant flown only on board a commissioned ship
companionway
deck opening giving access to a ladder includes the ladder.
compartment
interior space of a ship similar to a room ashore
conn
the act of controlling a ship also the station usually on the bridge from which a ship is controlled
course
a ships desired direction of travel not to be confused with heading
cover
to protect; a shelter; headgear; to don headgear.
coxswain
enlisted person in charge of a boat
CPO
Chief petty officer
crows nest
lookout station aloft
cumshaw
a gift; somehing procured without payment
darken ship
to turn off all external lights and close all openings through which lights can be seen from outside the ship
davits
strong arms by means of which a boat is hoisted in or out.
davy jones locker
the bottom of the sea
DCC
damage control center
dead ahead
directly ahead a relative bearing of 000 degrees
dead astern
180 degrees relative
deck
horizontal planking or plating that divides a ship into layers
deck seamanship
the upkeep and operation of all deck equipment.

decontaminate
to free from harmful residue of nuclear or chemical attack
deep six
to throw something overboard
dinghy
a small boat, sometimes equipped with a sail, but more commonly propelled by outboard motor or oars
dip
to lower a flag partway down the staff as a salute to, or in reply to a salute from another ship
distance line
a line stretched between two ships engaged in replenishment or transfer operations under way. the line is marked at 20 foot intervals to aid conning officer in maintaining the proper distance.
division
a main subdivision of a ships crew an organization coposed of two or more ships of the same type
dock
the water-space alongside a pier
dog
lever or bolt and thumb screws used for securing a water tight door; to divide a four hour watch into two two hour watches
dog down
to set the dogs on a watertight door
dog watch
the 1600-1800 or 1800-2000 watch
double up
to double the mooring lines for extra strength
draft
the vertical distance from the keel to the waterling
dress ship
to display flags in honor of a person or event
drift
the speed at which a ship is pushed off course by wind and current
drogue
sea anchor
dry dock
a dock either floating or built into the shore from which water may be removed for the purose of inspecting or working o a ships bottom to be put in dry dock
EAOS
end of active obligated sevice
ebb
a falling tide
eight o’clock reports
reports recieved by the executive officer from department heads shortly before 2000
ensign
the national flag; an O-1 paygrade officer.
executive officer
second officer in command also calle xo
eyes
the forward most part of the forecastle
F/MC
fleet or force master chief
fake
the act of making a lin, wire, or chain ready for running by laying it out in long, flat bights, one alongside and partially overlapping the other
fantail
the after end of the main deck
fathom
unit of length or depth equal to six feet
fender
a cushioning device hung over the side of aship to prevent contact between the ship and a pier or other ship
feild day
a day devoted to general cleaning usually in preparation for an inspection
fire main
shipboard piping system to which fire hydrants are connected
first lieutenant
the officer responsible in general for a ships upkeep and cleanliness boats ground tackle and deck seamanship
first watch
2000-2400 watch also called evening watch
five star admiral
fleet admiral a rank above admiral no longer used
flag officer
any officer of the rank of rear admiral(lower and upper half) vice admiral or admiral
flagstaff
vertical staff at the stern to which the ensign is hoisted when moored or at anchor
fleet
an organization of ships aircraft marine forces and shorebased fleet activities all under one commander for conducting mahjor operations
flood
to fill a space with water; a rising tide
fore and aft
the entire length of a ship as in sweep down fore and aft
forecastle
forward section of the main deck pronounced fohksul
foremost
first mast aft from the bow
forenoon watch
the 0800-1200 watch
forward
toward the bow
foul
entangled as in the lines are foul of each other, stormy
gaff
a light spar set at an angle from the upper part of a mast(the national ensign is usually flown from the gaff under way)
galley
space where food is prepared(never called a kitchen)
gangway
the opening in a bulwark or lifeline that provides access to a brow or accommodation ladder; an order meaning to cleat the way
general quarters
the condition of full readiness for battle
gig
boat assigned for the commanding officers personal use
ground tackle
equipment used in anchoring or mooring anchors
gunwale
where the sides join the main deck of a ship
halyard
a light line used to hoist a flag or pennant
handsomely
steadily and carefully, but not necessarily slowly.

hard over
condition of a rudder that has been turned to the maximum possible rudder angle
hashmark
a red blue or gold diagonal stripe across the left sleeve of enlisted persons jumper, indicating four years service
hatch
an opening in a deck used for access
haul
to pull in or heace on a line by hand
hawser
any heavy wire or line used for towing or mooring
head
the upper end of a lower mast boom; compartment containing toilet facilities; ships bow
heading
the direction toward which the ships bow is pointing any instant
heave
to throw as in heave a lin to the pier
heave around
to haul in a line usually by means of a capstan or winch
heaving line
a line with a weight at one end heaved across an intervening space for passing over a heavier line
helm
steering wheel of a ship
helmsman
person who steers the ship by turning the helm(also called the steersman)
highline
the line stretched between ships under way on which a trolley block travels back and forth to tgransfer material and personnel
hitch
to bend a line to or around a ring or cylindrical object; an enlistment
holiday
space on a surface that the painter neglected to paint.
hull
the shell, or plating, of a ship from keel to gunwale
hull down
a lookout term meaning that a ship is so far over the horizon that only her superstructure or top hamper is visible
inboard
toward the centerline
island
superstructure of an aircraft carrier
jack
starred blue flag(representing the union of the ensigh) flown at the jackstaff of a commissioned ship not under way
jackstaff
vertical spar at the stem to which th jack is hoisted
jacobs ladder
a portable rope or wire ladder
jettison
to throw overboard
jetty
a structure built out from shore to influence water currents of protect a harbor or pier.
jump ship
to desert ship
jury rig
any makshift device or apparatus; to fashion such a device.

knock off
quit, cease, or stop, as in knock off ships work.
knot
nautical mile per hour
ladder
a flight of steps aboard ship
landing craft
vessel especially designed for landing troops and equiped directly on a beach
landing ship
a large seagoing ship designed for landing personnel an or heavy equipment directly on beach
lanyard
any short line used as a handle or as a means for operating some piece of equipment ; a line used to attach an article to a the person, as a pistol lanyard
lash
to secure an object by turns of line, wire, or chain
launch
to float a vessel off the ways in a building yard; a type of powerboat, usually over 30 feet long.
lay
movement of a person as in lay aloft the direction of twist in the strands of a line or wire
lee
an area sheltered from the wind down wind.
leeward
direction toward which the wind is blowing pronounced loo-ard
LES
leave and earning statement
liberty
sanctioned abscence from a ship or station for a short time for pleasure rather that business
life jacket
a buoyant jacket desighned to support a person in the water
lifelines
in general the liners erected around the edge of a weather deck to prevent personnel from falling or being washed overboard more precisely the topmost line from top to bottom these lines are named lifeline housing lin and foot rope.
line
any rope that isnt wire rope
list
transverse inclination of a vessel when a ship leans to one side
log
a ships speedometer; book or ledger in which data or events that occurred during a watch are recorded; to make a certain speed, as in the ship logged 20 knots.”
look alive
admonishment meaning to be alert or move faster
lookout
person stationed topside on a formal watch who reports objects sighted and sounds heard to the officer of the deck
LPO
leading petty officer
lucky bag
locker under the charge of the master at arms; used to collect and stow deserters effects and gear found adrift
magazine
compartment used for the stowage of ammunition
main deck
the uppermost complete deck(an exception is the aircraft carrier, where the main deck is defined as the hangar bay rather than the flight deck which arguably fits the criteria of the definition)
mainmast
second mast aft from the bow on vessel with more than one mast. (on a ship with only one mast, it is usually referred to simply as the mast.

the tallest mast on a vessel.

main truck
the top of the tallest mast on a vessel
make fast
to secure
man
to assume a station as in to man a gun
man o war
ship desighned for combat
marlinespike
tapered steel tool used to open the strands of line or wire rope for spicing
marlinspike seamanship
the art of caring for and handling all types of line and wire
master at arms
a member of a ships police force
mate
a shipmate another sailor
MCPO
Master chief petty officer
MCPON
Master chief petty officer of the navy
mess
meal place where meals are eaten a group that takes meals together as in officers mess
messenger
a line used to haul a heavier line across an intervening space
midwatch
the watch that begins at 0000 and ends at 0400
moor
to make fast to a pier, another ship or a mooring buoy, also to anchor
mooring buoy
a large anchored float to which a ship may moor
morning watch
the 0400-0800
motor whaleboat
a double-ended powerboat
muster
a roll call to assemble for a roll call
nest
two or more boats stowed one within the other two or more ships moored alongside each other
nun buoy
a navigational buoy, conical in shape, painted red and even numbered, that marks the starboard side of a channel from seaward
OOD
officer of the deck
outboard
away from the centerline
overboard
over the side
overhaul
to repair or recondition; to overtake another vessel
overhead
the underside of a deck that forms the overhead of the compartment next below.
party
a group on teporary assignment or engaged in a common activity as in line handling party or a liberty party
passageway
a corridor used for interior horizontal movement aboard ship(similar to hallway ashore)
pay out
to feed out or lengthen a line
pigstick
small staff from which a commission pennant is flown
pilot house
enclosure on bridge housing the main steering controls
piloting
branch of navigation in which positions are determined by visible objects on the surface, or by soundings
pipe
to sound a particular call on a boatswains pipe
pitch
vertical rise and fall of a ships bow and stern caused by head or following seas
plane guard
destroyer or helicopter responsible for rescuing air cres during launch or recovery operations
plank owner
a person who was assigned to the ships company when he or she was commissioned
POD
plan of the day
pollywog
a person who has never crossed the equater
port
to the left of the centerline when facing forward
quarterdeck
deck area designated by the commanding officer as the place to carry out official functions; station of the officer of the deck in port
quartermaster
an enlisted assistant to the navigator
quarters
stations for shipboard evolutions as in general quarters “fire quarter” living spaces
quay
a solid structure along a bank used for loading and offloading vessels. pronounced key.
rat guard
a hinged metal disk secured to a mooring line to prevent rats from traveling over the line into the ship
ride
to be at anchor as in the ship si riding to her anchor
riding lights
navigational lights shown at night by a moored vessel
rig
to set up a device or equipment as in to rig a stage over the side
ropeyarn sunday
a workday or part of a workday that has veen granted as a sholday for taking care of personal business
SCPO
senior chief petty officer
scuttlebutt
a drinking fountain originally the ships water barrel
sea anchor
a device streamed from the bow of a vessel for holding it end on to the sea
sea state
condition of waves and the height of their swells
second deck
first complete deck below the main deck
secure
to make fast as in secure a line to a cleat to cease as in secure from fire drill
shellback
person who has crossed the equator
ship over
to re enlist in the navy
shoal
a structure similar to areef but more gradual in its ris from the floor of the ocean
skylark
to engage in irresponsible horseplay
sound
to determine depth of water
spar
the nautical equivalent of a pole
stack
shipboard chimney
stanchion
vertical post for supporting decks smaller similar posts for supporting lifelines awnings and so on
Starboard
directions to the right of the centerline as one faces forward
stem
extreme forward line of bow
stern
the aftermost part of a vessel
structural bulkhead
transvers strength bulkhead that forms a watertight boundary
swab
mop
tarpuline
canvas used as a cover
truck
uppermost tim of mast
turn in
go to bed
turn out
wake up
ucmj
uniform code of military justice
unrep
underway rplenishment
waist
amidships sectrion of the main deck
weigh anchor
to hoist the anchor clear of the bottom
wharf
structure similar to quay but constructed like a pier
yardarm
the port or starboard half of a spar set athwartships across the upper mast
yaw
to have its heading thrown wide of its course as the result of a force sucha s a heavy following sea.

allotment
an amount of money a member has coming out of his regular pay
bunk or rack
bed
chit book
coupon or reciept book
geedunk
candy, gum or cafeteria
jack box
access box to sound powered phone circuitry
reveille
wake up, start of day
scullery
place to wash dishes
taps
time to sleep, end of day
tattoo
five minutes before taps
a
alpha
b
bravo
c
charlie
d
delta
e
echo
f
foxtrot
g
golf
h
hotel
i
india
j
juliet
k
kilo
l
lima
m
mike
n
november
o
oscar
p
papa
q
quebec
r
romeo
s
sierra
t
tango
u
uniform
v
victor
w
wiskey
x
xray
y
yankee
z
zulu
1st general order of a sentry
to take charge of this post and all government property in view.
2nd general order of a sentry
to walk my post in a military manner, keeping always on the alert and observing everything that takes place with sight or hearing
3rd general order of a sentry
to rport all violations of orders i am instructed to enforce
4th general order of a sentry
to repeat all calls from posts more distant from the guardhouse than my own
5th general order of a sentry
to quit my post only when properly relieved
6th general order of a sentry
to recieve, obey and pass to the sentry who relieves me all orders from the commanding officer, command duty officer, officer of the deck, and officers and petty officers of the watch.
7th general order of a sentry
to talk to no one except in the line of duty
8th general order of a sentry
to give alarm in case of fire or disorder
9th general order of a sentry
to call the officer of the deck in any case not covered by instructions
10th general order of a sentry
to salute all officers and all colors and standards not cased.
11th general order of a sentry
to be especially watchful at night, and during the time for challenging, to challenge all persons on or near my post, and to allow no one to pass without proper authority
destroyer (arliegh burke class)
[image]

General Characteristics, Arleigh Burke class
Builder: Bath Iron Works, Northrop Grumman Ship SystemsSPY-1 Radar and Combat System Integrator: Lockheed-Martin
Date Deployed: July 4, 1991 (USS Arleigh Burke)
Propulsion: Four General Electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; two shafts, 100,000 total shaft horsepower.
Length: Flights I and II (DDG 51-78): 505 feet (153.

92 meters)Flight IIA (DDG 79 AF): 509½ feet (155.29 meters).

Beam: 59 feet (18 meters).
Displacement: DDG 51 through 71: 8,230 L tons (8,362.06 metric tons) full load DDG 72 through 78: 8,637 L tons (8,775.

6 metric tons) full load DDG 79 and Follow: 9,496 L tons (9,648.40 metric tons) full load.

Speed: In excess of 30 knots.
Crew: 276
Armament: Standard Missile (SM-2MR); Vertical Launch ASROC (VLA) missiles; Tomahawk®; six MK-46 torpedoes (from two triple tube mounts); Close In Weapon System (CIWS), 5” MK 45 Gun, Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile (ESSM) (DDG 79 AF)
Aircraft: Two LAMPS MK III MH-60 B/R helicopters with Penguin/Hellfire missiles and MK 46/MK 50 torpedoes.

aircraft carrier

General Characteristics, Nimitz Class
Builder: Newport News Shipbuilding Co.

, Newport News, VA.

Date Deployed: May 3, 1975 (USS Nimitz).
Unit Cost: About $4.5 billion each.
Propulsion: Two nuclear reactors, four shafts.
Length: 1,092 feet (332.

85 meters).

Beam: 134 feet (40.84 meters); Flight Deck Width: 252 feet (76.8 meters).
Displacement: Approximately 97,000 tons (87,996.

9 metric tons) full load.

Speed: 30+ knots (34.5+ miles per hour).
Crew: Ship’s Company: 3,200 – Air Wing: 2,480.
Armament: Two or three (depending on modification) NATO Sea Sparrow launchers, 20mm Phalanx CIWS mounts: (3 on Nimitz and Dwight D.

Eisenhower and 4 on Vinson and later ships of the class.).

Aircraft: 85.

attack submarine

General Characteristics, Los Angeles class
Builder: Newport News Shipbuilding Co.; General Dynamics Electric Boat Division.
Date Deployed: Nov 13, 1976 (USS Los Angeles)
Propulsion: One nuclear reactor, one shaft
Length: 360 feet (109.

73 meters)

Beam: 33 feet (10.06 meters)
Displacement: Approximately 6,900 tons (7011 metric tons) submerged
Speed: 25+ knots (28+ miles per hour, 46.3 +kph)
Crew: 16 Officers; 127 Enlisted
Armament: Tomahawk missiles, VLS tubes (SSN 719 and later), MK48 torpedoes, four torpedo tubes.

cruiser

General Characteristics, Ticonderoga Class
Builder: Ingalls Shipbuilding: CG 47-50, CG 52-57, 59, 62, 65-66, 68-69, 71-73Bath Iron Works: CG 51, 58, 60-61, 63-64, 67, 70.
Date Deployed: 22 January 1983 (USS Ticonderoga)
Unit Cost: About $1 billion each.
Propulsion: 4 General Electric LM 2500 gas turbine engines; 2 shafts, 80,000 shaft horsepower total.
Length: 567 feet.
Beam: 55 feet.

Displacement: 9,600 tons (9,754.06 metric tons) full load.
Speed: 30 plus knots.
Crew: 24 Officers, 340 Enlisted.
Armament: MK41 vertical launching system Standard Missile (MR); Vertical Launch ASROC (VLA) Missile; Tomahawk Cruise Missile; Six MK-46 torpedoes (from two triple mounts); Two MK 45 5-inch/54 caliber lightweight guns; Two Phalanx close-in-weapons systems.
Aircraft: Two SH-60 Seahawk (LAMPS III).

F/A-18 Hornet strike fighter

General Characteristics, Super Hornet, E and F models
Primary Function: Multi-role attack and fighter aircraft.
Contractor: McDonnell Douglas.
Date Deployed: First flight in November 1995. Initial Operational Capability (IOC) in September 2001 with VFA-115, NAS Lemoore, Calif. First cruise for VFA-115 is onboard the USS Abraham Lincoln.

Unit Cost: $57 million
Propulsion: Two F414-GE-400 turbofan engines. 22,000 pounds (9,977 kg) static thrust per engine.
Length: 60.3 feet (18.5 meters).
Height: 16 feet (4.87 meters).
Wingspan: 44.

9 feet (13.68 meters).

Weight: Maximum Take Off Gross Weight is 66,000 pounds (29,932 kg).
Airspeed: Mach 1.8+.
Ceiling: 50,000+ feet.
Range: Combat: 1,275 nautical miles (2,346 kilometers), clean plus two AIM-9sFerry: 1,660 nautical miles (3,054 kilometers), two AIM-9s, three 480 gallon tanks retained.

Crew: A, C and E models: OneB, D and F models: Two.
Armament: One M61A1/A2 Vulcan 20mm cannon; AIM 9 Sidewinder, AIM-9X (projected), AIM 7 Sparrow, AIM-120 AMRAAM, Harpoon, Harm, SLAM, SLAM-ER (projected), Maverick missiles; Joint Stand-Off Weapon (JSOW); Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM); Data Link Pod; Paveway Laser Guided Bomb; various general purpose bombs, mines and rockets. See the F/A-18 weapons load-out page.

EA-6B Prowler electronic warfare aircraft
 

General Characteristics
Primary Function: Electronic countermeasures.

Contractor: Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation.
Date Deployed: First Flight: 25 May 1968; Operational Capability: July 1971.
Propulsion: Two Pratt & Whitney J52-P408 engines (10,400 pounds thrust each).

Length: 59 feet 10 inches (17.7 meters).
Height: 16 feet 8 inches (4.9 meters).

Wingspan: 53 feet (15.9 meters).
Weight: Maximum Take Off Gross Weight: 61,500 pounds (27,450 kg).
Airspeed: 500 Kts + (575 mph, 920 kmh).
Ceiling: 37,600 feet.
Range: 1,000 nautical miles+ (1,150 miles, 1,840 km).
Crew: Pilot and three electronic countermeasures officers.

 

E-2 Hawkeye early warning and control aircraft

General Characteristics
Primary Function: Airborne Command & Control, Battle Space Management.
Contractor: Northrop Grumman Aerospace Corp.
Date Deployed: January 1964.
Unit Cost: $80 million.
Propulsion: Two Allison T-56-A427 turboprop engines; (5,100 shaft horsepower each).
Length: 57 feet 6 inches (17.5 meters).
Height: 18 feet 3 inches (5.

6 meters).

Wingspan: 80 feet 7 inches (28 meters).
Weight: Max. gross, take-off: 53,000 lbs (23,850 kg) 40,200 lbs basic (18,090 kg).
Airspeed: 300+ knots (345 miles, 552 km. per hour).
Ceiling: 30,000 feet (9,100 meters).
Crew: Five.
 

S-3B Viking detection and attack of submarines aircraft
 

General Characteristics
Primary Function: Force Protection, Organic overhead/mission tanking.
Contractor: Lockheed Martin Aeronautics.
Date Deployed: 1975
Unit Cost: $27 million.
Propulsion: Two TF-34-GE-400B turbofan engines (9,275 pounds of thrust each)
Length: 53.3 feet
Height: 22.75 feet
Wingspan: 68.7 feet
Weight: Empty, 26,650 pounds; maximum takeoff, 52,539 pounds
Airspeed: 450 knots/0.79 Mach.
Ceiling: 40,000 feet.
Range: 2,300-plus nautical miles
Crew: One pilot, two naval flight officers
Armament: AGM-84H/K SLAM-ER, AGM-84 Harpoon and AGM-65 Laser Maverick missiles, bombs, rockets, Mk46/Mk50 torpedoes.

SH-60 Seahawk helicopter

General Characteristics
Primary Function: Varies with the particular military service.
Contractor: Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation (airframe); General Electric Company (engines); IBM Corporation (avionics components).
Propulsion: Two General Electric T700-GE-700 or T700-GE-701C engines; thrust: up to 1,940 shaft horsepower.
Length: 64 feet 10 inches (19.6 meters).
Height: Varies with the version; from 13 to 17 feet (3.9 to 5.1 meters).
Rotor Diameter: 53 feet 8 inches (16.4 meters).
Weight: Varies; 21,000 to 23,000 pounds (9,450 to 10,350 kg).
Airspeed: 180 knots maximum.
Range: Generally about 380 nautical miles (600 km); range becomes unlimited with air refueling capability.
Crew: Three to four.