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Growing up in 3 Sub-Saharan countries has been one of the most instrumental elements in shaping the person that I am today. Their cosmopolitan populations did not only allow me to develop a more open mind, but also ingrained in me a strong sense of pluralism by exposing me to their national and international cultures and people. Throughout my schooling life in these countries, not only was I able to improve my english proficiency, but I was also fortunate enough to grasp a fair amount of Amharic, Chichewa, and French by interacting with my peers whose ethnicities ranged from some of the 72 tribes in the region, to Asian and even European. 

As a consequence of these contrasting experiences I, unknowingly, found myself leading parallel lives. One of African values of family, respect, perseverance, and the other of Western principles such as discipline, hard work, and punctuality; kindred lives that helped solidify my relationships with others and taught me one of my most valuable life lessons. Whereas several individuals consider cultural disparity a cause of conflict, on the contrary, I have learnt that cultural diversity can intrinsically be the foundation on which people can connect and share, forming lasting bonds. For this and many other reasons, I have chosen Tufts University College; a community that fosters the positive impacts of people’s varied experiences; so that learning is propelled from the Hewitt Dining Hall all the way to residential halls; leaving each interaction with a piece of knowledge.