Religion in Robert Frost’s Poetry Religion and poetry are things that are not usually used hand-in-hand. The great thing about poetry, however, is that you can get your point across in a few lines and make yourself heard while leaving many different interpretations to be available. Religion, much like poetry, can be understood and interpreted in many ways. These two forms of expression can even shed light on people who might need that guidence or motivation to improve themself or another. In such poems like “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost, we get the sense that he trys to portray a meaning of direction.Which path we chose ultimatly leads us along a certain journey, whether that is either the right one or not.

“Stopping by Woods on a Stormy Evening” also by Robert Frost, seems to be another way of saying we should enjoy our life and even the small things or the unexpected. Sometimes Life can be over-whelming, and drops things on us that we either cannot handle or find it very difficult to overcome, and we just need a refreshment to liven things back up and get us to rightful standings. This seems to be the thought in “After Apple-Picking,” written by Robert Frost.

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Thats the beautiful thing about religion, that almost everyone is curious about it, likes something about it, or even finds controversy over it. Poetry is much the same, and Robert Frost tends to sum up a lot of social issues and even life lessons that some people often look past, or completely ignore, within his work. “The Road Not Taken” is a poem that reflects everyones life and journey through it.

Robert Frost talks about looking down two paths and try to see as much as he can down them. We tend to do the same when it comes to religion.In everyones life, we all get that moment where we either choose to follow God, or completely ignore him. Granted that decision could come twice or more in a lifetime, buit it’s what we ultimatly choose that is the key to our future. In the final few lines of the poem, Frost writes: “I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference” (Frost, 121). It almost sounded like he wanted a change, and for the better, knowing that the other path has been walked down many times, maybe even refering to himself constantly choosing the wrong path and finally making the decision to walk to right one.People everyday walk the wrong path and never seem to end up the right way or fall into a trap that they can’t get out of. Most Christians can probably agree that at one point or another they weren’t doing the right things, and then something hit them (not literally), and it turned their whole life around.

I, for one, can attest to that. My life was in a complete spiral until all of a sudden, almost literally out of thin air, I felt God and knew right then and there that I needed him and quite frankly he was always there, I just never realized or cared.I finally chose the right path after a lifetime of walking the wrong one, just like in “The Road Not Taken”. Along this journey we all take through life, we can often come across things that we do not expect and even cannot control. It’s what we make of them that determines how our outlook is conceived.

This exact situational occurance is shown well in Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”. He talks about how he is on horseback riding in the woods as he stops and notices all of his surroundings.This seems to be a relation to our lives, we sometimes stop and realize the good things about life and how we can be a small part of making the world a better place. In an analysis by Annabella Gualdoni, she tells us that: “Frost’s famous phrase “And miles to go before I sleep” not only refers to the physical distance of the trip but also that he still has a long life ahead of him. Sleep often symbolizes death, and the author seems to suggest that his life journey is far from over” (Gualdoni, 1). This author thinks that the trip, as refered to in the poem, is long, much like the life that they still have yet to come.

That can be said for many believers of religion also, people might suddenly realize they have a whole life ahead of them, and not to waste it. It builds a certain amount of confidence to people knowing that there is light at the end of the tunnel. Sometimes in faith and even everyday life we come across times of hardship. Things can turn upside down quickly and we seem to never know how to get out of it. This seems to be the problem in “After Apple-Picking”, as the apples just keep coming and coming and it just becomes very tiring and overwhelming.

He uses the ladder as almost a metaphor for a stairway to heaven, looking forward to everything that entales with it, but knows that life on Earth must be complete and that will have its hard times and challenges. It almost sounds like the poem goes into a depressive state as well, as going from talking about heaven and apples to winter and sleep (meaning death). In an Analysis by John Muste, he thinks that “It is typical of Frost’s approach to the larger questions of life that he does not provide or even suggest an answer to the questions he raises, preferring to leave the reader to find the way to his or her own answers.The poem finally leaves the impression that the sensory enjoyment of the endeavor provides its true justification, but that the larger issues it implies are beyond human understanding.

” (Muste, 1). From this selection, Muste believes that Frost wants the readers to realize the possibilities about life after death and almost encourages everyone to find a meaning and a truth in life besides running around in a circle forever always worried about the small things and everyday issues. In conclusion, we learn that poetry and religion can co-incide together.Robert Frost does a great job in making the reader dive into his thoughts about his thoughts on Religion and life as a whole. His poems give us ideas and realizations about questions that we ask ourselves all the time.

Life is not meant to be easy, but is meant to give us challenges and struggles to make us grow as humans and to educate us about things. Frost also eludes to events in his own life, and seems to relate to things that he might have come to a crossroads at one point and fell into his own happiness in finding God.He never really says in his work but it almost sounds like he was still looking, much like people do even now, to find the answer to life’s biggest question. In the end though, it all comes down to faith. 1. Frost, Robert.

“The Road Not Taken. ” Literature. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2011. 121. Print. 2. Gualdoni, Annabella.

“Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening: An Analysis of Robert Frost’s Beloved Poem | Suite101. com. ” Annabella Gualdoni | Suite101. com.

Suite 101, 13 Feb. 2010. Web. 09 Nov.

2011. . 3. Muste, John M. “After Apple-Picking. ” Literary Reference Center.

EBSCO, Jan. 2002. Web. 9 Nov.

2011. .