The theory of Krashen has been very interesting to read. The article provides lots of information that as educators is very good to know. I must point out that as an ELL I can indentify my self with what his theory states.

Krashen’s theory has five main points that I will summary below. The first part of his theory is “the Acquisition-Learning hypothesis” or the language acquisition, which states that acquiring a language, is a subconscious process similar to which children experience with their first language.  Yet “Learning,” differ, by being more like a conscious process which focuses on the language for example knowledge of grammar rules. By all mean acquiring occurs naturally, while learning is a process following rules. The second part of his theory is the Monitor hypothesis.

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According to Krashen, The monitor helps a person polish their writing due to the reason that it focuses on rules and correctness.   It acts as an editor. Monitors may be over-used which are students that heavy concern about mistakes and under users. A psychological profile can determine if a person is an under-user or over-user. Commonly extroverts are under-users of the monitor, while introverts are over-users.The third part is the Natural Order hypothesis. This part of his theory points out that the acquisition of grammatical structures follows a natural order, which is predictable. But for a given language some aspects of the language come more quickly than others.

Yet he doesn’t believe that this should be follow like a syllabus when acquisition is the goal. The fourth part the Input hypothesis that focuses on the input given to the learner.  This provides input a little bit further than what we already can understand in order to acquire more the language. But since each student is different Kashen suggests that it should be given according to the students need. The last hypothesis of his theory is the Affective Filter hypothesis.

This part of his theory states that students with low motivation, low self-esteem, and anxiety can form a mental block to their acquisition of language. Meaning that if one is “uninterested, dislike the language, or feel anxious our evolution will be slowed down.”