Things are rarely as they appear. Science lets us wade through the misinformation, the illusions and base our answers on evidence and facts. We can speculate and assume all we want, but that doesn’t change the truth. I suspect that’s what drew me to science. Life is unstable, science is not. Growing up in a first generation family where everyone had different views on everything impacted me greatly. I found a person’s ability to so adamantly insist on being correct when their ideas were based on nothing more than opinion and conjecture frustrating and fascinating. I wanted to be as sure of things as people around me seemed to be.  I guess we are supposed to feign confidence and knowledge in order to fit in. My curious mind and shy spirit made my middle school and high years difficult.  Science gave me a sense of safety. It was okay to not have the answers, as long as you were open minded enough to search for them. Mistakes were part of the process. In science, you didn’t need to insist you were right because it was futile and ridiculous in the face of eventual evidence.  That’s what I loved about it and still do. It’s the perfect combination of math, philosophy, and biology. I would like to pursue a career in the sciences, preferably biology, because it underlies every aspect of our existence. Biology is in our emotional lives as well as our physical ones. It’s our history and our future. I want to be able to give back to the world in a way that would allow others to find comfort and healing when they need it most. I am most definitely involved and immersed in the recent advancements of this field, since we’re living life much more comfortably than people hundreds of years ago did. I have always been fascinated by the technology that has further advanced our knowledge on the modern fields of today, such as the rising department of synthetic biology or the modern approach of using mathematics to understand biological processes. When I travel to beaches outside of the city or take time to just enjoy a walk in the park, I am regularly asking questions about my surroundings to myself, as any scientist would do. I constantly want to be able to understand the specific chemical and physical interactions taking place. I routinely will curiously examine my setting for any wildlife found on the ground or search for those that inhabit the sky. Questions continually build up in my head surrounding ideas that include how we, humans, impact that specific environment, to questions that consist of asking myself on how an area evolved to be what it was. The more time I invest myself in nature, the more questions I have and the more I want to further investigate the subjects I am fascinated in. In this way, I am propelled by nature to go after a degree that allows me to continue to investigate and create new questions to captivate my brain about my everyday atmospheres.I thoroughly understand that many biology courses demand a student to strictly understand any piece of given information, in addition to executing vigorous amounts of studying to confirm the brain has encoded what is expected to be known. If I had thought of biology to be effortless and uncomplicated, I would not find the field to be rewarding enough to engage myself in. I believe entirely that biology is a subject that has the ability to engross myself in thought and allows me to be much more innovative and adventurous in my work. I believe that any of the experiences created in learning about the topics I doubtlessly love outweighs and is worth any of the anticipated turmoil or even lack of sleep. If biology wasn’t a subject that had the capability to challenge me, it simply would not change me. Ergo, pursuing a career in biology would be the ideal position for me to be able to consistently be ingenious and deliberate in my work, including for the future years to come.