Thomas Paine was born in the year of 1737 and 1809 he shaped the concepts that helped the “Age of Revolutions” Written in 1776 he wrote the super popular book named “Common Sense” this was the first book to promote the independence of America. After he wrote the “Crisis” documents in the Revolution of America. He went back to Europe, he was able to take advantage his knowledge he gained from America in Europe in the French Revolution, when he wrote the book “The Rights of Man” His views on politics did lead to him going to prison. After he was released from prison, he then wrote the last of the great pamphlets written by him. Some of this included the “Ages of Reasons” and the “Agrarian Release” which was a call for land reform. A famous quote written by John Adams said ” I know not whether any man in the world has had more influential on its inhabitants or affairs for the last thirty years than Thomas Paine” Common Sense has sold more than 150000 copies in the year if 1775 which was was a groundbreaking number, at the time. Paine worked as a excise trade collector. His father’s religion helped and inspired Paine the topic of humanitarianism and a very deep and genuine interest in the Newtonian Sciences, this undoubtedly aided Paine to acquire a hatred for the systems that were established on the principles of rudimentary knowledge. Paine then moved to the town of Philadelphia in the year of 1774 and quickly became familiar with the profoundness of political change. In January of 1776, Paine wrote Common Sense, which was the first book of its type to be a major supporter of American Independence. It was wildly successful. This book outlined the types of concepts that never strayed far from Paine’s thought/opinion/idea. The fact that the book sold over 150,000 copies was a major tribute to not only to the clarity and power of his writing and literary style, but also to the effectiveness and persuasiveness of his argument/claim. Paine had the task of addressing a mass audience with watered-down versions of complex rhetoric, legal precedents, and classical learning, on his hands. Paine had to strive for simplicity to reach this number. Over the next couple of years, Paine put him under the struggle