Traffic jams on intersections have been the result of poorly timed lights that fail to meet the average citizen’s standards. So far, little has been done to prevent these jam-ups, and serious wrecks are starting to come out of them. Some cities have tried scanning lights. Reactive scanning lights could work to solve this problem because several previous attempts at this have proved beneficial and it has been known to reduce the number of traffic violations. Also, the system is made to work out efficient solutions, and city officials have said that adaptive lights have led to significant declines in the hassle of dealing with traffic problems.     Car congestion seems to be clogging roads in every single part of America and studies show that this is happening across the globe. Studies in New York City reveal that the amount of time it takes to get somewhere is increased by 35%. That is 2% more than last year! This means that New Yorkers waste upwards of 129 hours a year sitting in traffic jams. That means a normal drive to the comic store down 4 blocks would take almost 45 minutes. Luckily, there is a way to fix this.    Over the past few decades, some transportation agencies have replaced old fashioned pre-timed lights with newer technologies that detect the presence of cars. They use sensors to find how many cars are in one lane and the best possible way to equally distribute cars coming from all directions. This is helping but not enough.Newer technologies include intersections that use real-time sensors and cameras to detect traffic violations. To some people, the may seem like enough, but some people are wondering how to prevent it. They are using this and working off of it to produce a better system.    The system works like this: as you approach the intersection, your car transmits data, such as speed, trajectory, and location, to the system which use the info from all the cars to equally and quickly distribute traffic. It will also use the system from the previous paragraph to monitor and report traffic violations. It can even identify the car and driver for the police.    City officials that have experienced the system say that these lights, known as adaptive signals, have led to a significant decline in both the hassle and cost of of commuting. Now, all police have to do to clear up a jam is find the driver how violated traffic and ticket them.Adaptive lights could work solve this problem because several previous attempts at this have proved beneficial and it has been known to reduce the number of traffic violations.Also, the system is made to work out efficient solutions, and city officials have said that adaptive lights have led to significant declines in the hassle of dealing with traffic problems, such as a certain light outside our school. These lights could be the solution we have been looking for. Imagine always getting to work on time, no road rage and the quiet sound of no honking horns because some angry driver ran a red light to get his kid to school on time. That would make life better. Also, another plus is the amount of jobs opening. Think of how many intersections there are in america. Then multiply that number times 2. Each intersection needs 2 bug and virus monitors to stay operational. This system wouldn’t only work in america, this system would work anywhere there are cars. Just imagine the possibilities.     Resources:Eric Jaffe @e_jaffe Feed Eric Jaffe is the former New York bureau chief for CityLab. He is the author of A Curious Madness and The King’s Best Highway. “How Virtual Traffic Lights Could Cut Down on Congestion.” CityLab, 5 Feb. 2013, Funkhouser, Mark. “How Cities and States Use Technology to Reduce Traffic Congestion.” Governing Magazine: State and Local Government News for America’s Leaders, GOVERNING Magazine, 1987, www.governing.com/topics/transportation-infrastructure/how-cities-and-states-are-using-technology-to-reduce-traffic-congestion.html.www.citylab.com/transportation/2013/02/virtual-traffic-lights-real-traffic-reduction/4594/.Jaffe, Eric. “How Virtual Traffic Lights Could Cut Down on Congestion.”Www.citylab.com/Transportation/2013/02/Virtual-Traffic-Lights-Real-Traffic-Reduction/4594/.,       4. Author, Unknown. “New York Traffic Statistics.” TomTom Traffic Index, TomTom International BV, 2016, www.tomtom.com/en_gb/trafficindex/city/new-york.       5. Sanburn, Josh. “How Smart Traffic Lights Could Transform Your Commute.” Time, Time, 5 May 2015, time.com/3845445/commuting-times-adaptive-traffic-lights/.