Among the Tchambuli, a reversal of social roles expectations in the most communities is displayed by their way of living with women assuming harsh, dominating roles while men assume polite quite manners. The children are treated alike and allowed to associate with each other without any restrictions until they reach the age of six to seven years. It is at this point that the women start including girls in their work.

Women are responsible for fishing and weaving mosquito nets while men take up the role of trading their wives’ wares in the market and buy food items for their families. Men are hardly involved in community activities and take up most of their time with the children. It this regard then, they is charged with the role of child rearing. Women did not display any kind of concern with physical adornment; they shaved their heads and were more predisposed to cracking wild jokes and laughing loud raucous laughter.

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Men in contrast concentrated much on their dressing and hairdos and they engaged much into music, dancing and carving wood (Ward 2007p 154). Conclusion From the description of the two societies, it is quite apparent that society plays a vital role in the creation of personalities in the people who occupy these geographical areas. Women in the Maasai community for example are charged with the responsibility of child rearing a premise we find common with the men in Tchambuli.

The expectation that a society places on an individual also directs an individual to act in a certain culturally expected way e. g. the ages acts as the main criterion that the maasai use to divide the duties found in the community such that a boy stops taking care of the cattle at circumcision then assumes the protection of the society and settles disputes later on in life.

A male like standard of social living is displayed by women among the tchambuli, because this community has chosen to live in this way thus rendering Miller’s definition valid to the extent that people live according to the system adopted by the people living within a society. References Amin W. et al. (2005) the Last of the Maasai? Camerapix, P16-23 Ward C (2007) a world full of women? – Page 56 Haworth Press P150, 154